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Getty Images partners with celebrated photographer Campbell Addy in ongoing drive to create and promote diversity in stock imagery

by Simpson on June 13, 2017 in Events, Latest News, Lead Article, News you can use, Nuggets, Uncategorized

Getty Images partners with celebrated photographer Campbell Addy in ongoing drive to create and promote diversity in stock imagery
  • Getty Images collaborates with acclaimed editorial photographer Campbell Addy to create artistic model released portraits which celebrate individuality
  • Campbell Addy to join Getty Images panel at Cannes Lions ‘Seeing is Believing: The Power of Re-picturing Stereotypes’

Getty Images, a world leader in visual communications, is excited to announce a new exclusive contributor partnership with celebrated editorial photographer Campbell Addy, marking another step in its ongoing commitment to drive change in promoting a more diverse, inclusive and representative visual language. The partnership sees Addy turn his attention to stock imagery for the first time ever, with the creation of 42 artistic model released portraits as commissioned by Getty Images.

A recent graduate of Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design, Addy is known for editorial work which celebrates individuality while exploring the issues of empowerment and representation within race. He has also been widely applauded for the casting and modelling agency Nii Agency which he founded in the summer of 2016, with the aim of showing that the most interesting and diverse of people can be ‘models’ and an important part of our visual culture.

The portraits, featuring talent represented by Nii Agency, are just the beginning of Getty Images’ collaboration with Addy as it continues its drive to produce and offer imagery which better represents diverse audiences.

“At a time when imagery is the most widely spoken global language it has never been more important to produce and promote a visual language that is progressive and inclusive and to support diverse voices in doing so,” said Andy Saunders, Senior Vice President Creative Content at Getty Images.

“We believe passionately that images have the power to drive change, so we could not be more excited to be collaborating with Campbell Addy, a photographer who has a talent for celebrating individuality in his imagery, to further fuel and encourage the normalisation of diversity in visual communications.”

“Getty Images is known worldwide for being a hub of tremendous photographic projects and images so I was very excited when they approached me, as it gave a sense of validation to my work,” said Addy. “The team has been incredibly supportive of me creating work which I believe in, allowing me full creative control on the work being produced. It’s great for such a conglomerate in the creative industry to be picking up young creatives such as myself and truly collaborating, I believe it’s setting a precedent.”

Addy continues, “It is my aim with the portraits I have created to highlight and celebrate diversity in society and ultimately drive positive change in visual language. It’s something I’m really passionate about so it’s incredibly exciting to be taking action in partnership with Getty Images.”

The collaboration follows other recent partnerships Getty Images has initiated with the aim of creating and distributing imagery which breaks down stereotypes, changes perspectives and promotes equality. Partners include MuslimGirl, Refinery 29 on the ‘No Apologies’ and ‘The 67%’ collections, Jaguar Land Rover, Women’s Sport Trust and the Lean In Org on the Getty Images Lean In Collection, which celebrated its three year anniversary in March.

Campbell Addy will also be a featured speaker on Getty Images’ panel Seeing is Believing: The Power of Re-picturing Stereotypes at Cannes Lions on Thursday 22nd June at 4pm in the Lumiere Theatre. The talk will explore why imagery is so important when it comes to reframing concepts of gender, race, mental illness, LGBTQ and religion – altering perceptions, evoking empathy and engaging brands more deeply with a broader audience.

 

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