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[Events] … DMA challenges brands to re-connect with consumers on data

by on February 26, 2016 in Apps & Software, Events, Events & Awards, Latest News, Lead Article, News you can use, Nuggets, Tech

Data is at the heart of the modern economy, but recent press exposés have highlighted how companies are risking significant reputational damage by not taking responsibility for how they handle and source data.

At today’s Data Protection 2016 conference, the DMA will call on brands and marketers to re-connect with consumers to build relationships based on trust, while launching a range of new guidance, measures and training to aid industry professionals in raising their standards.

The conference includes keynotes from both the government minister responsible for data protection and the Information Commissioner, on the same stage for the first time since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was finalised.

The DCMS’ Baroness Neville-Rolfe, DBE CMG, will offer the Government’s view on data protection policy, particularly on nuisance calls, as well as legislative change and the challenges, while the Information Commissioner Christopher Graham will address the implementation of GDPR in the UK and reflect on the impact that organisations’ attitudes to compliance can have on their reputations.

In addition, there will be speakers from Barclays, Facebook and RNLI discussing the implications of the GDPR, attempts to replace the Safe Harbour agreement and how to use consumer data in a sustainable way.

Chris Combemale, CEO of DMA Group, comments: “As an industry, we need to re-connect with consumers on the issue of data and build new relationships based on transparency and trust. As data and marketing professionals, we must be aware and responsible for our actions when using consumer data. In building a new framework that fits with GDPR, Privacy Shield and the expectations of consumers, brands can do a lot more than just ensure their compliance and put their customers at the heart of what they do. In a modern data-driven economy, this will not only protect the consumer, but safeguard the brand’s own reputation in the long run.

That’s why we’re dedicated to offering the industry we’re passionate about the latest advice, education and training needed to cultivate a successful future that puts the customer first.”

Baroness Neville-Rolfe, the minister for data protection policy, said: “Data protection is a major issue for consumers and business alike. When it comes to unsolicited direct marketing calls, regrettably some organisations continue to break the law, with one of the reasons being the difficulty in tracing them. That is why we have recently consulted on a proposal to require all direct marketing callers to provide caller ID. We are currently analysing responses but my first impression is that there has been overwhelming support for our proposals.

This move has the potential to make a real difference, giving individuals a genuine choice about whether or not to accept a call and make it easier to report unwanted calls to the ICO.”

Christopher Graham, Information Commissioner, adds: “This is an important time for companies to be getting the law right. We’ve been clear that we’re willing to use our fining powers where appropriate; but we’ve also seen that the time, energy and money it takes to rebuild customer confidence after a breach can be as severe a punishment as any regulator’s fine. As the new EU data protection framework provides for even bigger fines and bigger headlines it’s more than ever important to stay on the right side of the law – and the right side of customers and potential customers.”

In anticipation of new regulations and a changing data ecosystem, in late 2014 the new DMA Code was launched, comprising 5 key principles that offer a framework for businesses to build a culture of trust with their customers. This Code and the selection of specialist guides remain at the heart of DMA’s guidance, with the latest range of events, processes and training announced today will further help businesses ensure they are ready for GDPR, including:

  1. Dedicated GDPR content & website: Offering all the latest information businesses will need
  2. Guidance on data compliance: Advice and consultancy available direct from the DMA’s legal experts
  3. Events: A range of legal updates, webinars, workshops and the continuation of the DMA’s regular Data Protection conferences
  4. Training: A new one-day dedicated GDPR course and IDM online certificate in GDPR
  5. Membership compliance process: Updated compliance process for companies dealing in data, including an external audit, to provide brands and agencies with additional assurances when using DMA member companies

The next Data Protection 2016 – GDPR Update conference is due to take place on 30th September 2016, where professionals will have the opportunity to discuss the latest implications and updates to GDPR affecting the new data privacy landscape.

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