TheMarketingblog

Shaken & Stirred - Influential Brand Profiling and Positioning

Peak Content : “Prepare for a high-octane career of constant deadlines, fewer investigative roles and liaising more directly with the sales team” – Ian McCawley, Acuity PR

Erica Berger the founder of Catchpool writes ..

Does it feel like you’re reading, watching, and listening to more information than ever before?

Or alternatively, after spending the last few years too overwhelmed in the digital age, have you turned off Twitter, put away your devices, maybe even started to read some print papers and magazines again, on a new found quest to find some sense of calm amidst the flurry of information?

You’re not alone. But I’m sure you knew that already…from social media, of course

Or, as I like to call it, “peak content.”

Exclusive comment from Ian McCawley, MD Acuity PR

Traditional journalism has been swept up in the quickening tide of content creation.

Anyone entering the industry will have to get used to the idea that, for the most part, the days of the considered editorial piece are done, as the reader’s insatiable appetite for up-to-the-minute news continues to grow. The other major change to the way our media works is the influence of the commercial department.

Struggling trade magazines, for example, have had to adapt to a more sales-led climate to survive; even then, many have already fallen by the wayside. What does this mean for the tyro journalist? They’ll have to prepare for a high-octane career of constant deadlines, fewer investigative roles and liaising more directly with the sales team.

…………………………………………………………………

Getting back to Eric’s article … Most of the time, when we talk about journalism and media, we talk about ad dollars, circulation revenue, and attention (let’s be real—clicks) from the audience. I’m not the first to write about the decline in the quality of editorial content or ad dollars. But it is rare that we discuss what online media in particular is doing to journalists, writers, and editors in the fast-moving digital age.

Jim Tankersley is economic policy correspondent for The Washington Post. In an interview with Quartz, Tankersley notes that while reporting has always been demanding, the current environment has created problems far beyond the bounds of workplace exhaustion.

Read MORE >>>>