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How to view and edit passwords saved with Safari

by on March 6, 2020 in Business, Latest News, Lead Article, News you can use, Nuggets, Tech

How to view and edit passwords saved with Safari

Many MAC users love to use Safari’s password AutoFill feature. Discover right here how to view and edit passwords saved with Safari.

Do you own a Mac computer? Are you using the Safari web browser? Then you are likely a regular user of Safari’s password AutoFill feature.

This feature makes life easier when it comes to logging-in. It saves you time and requires little effort. But sometimes, you may want to revisit the old passwords that you previously saved in Safari.

Old passwords lying unused in Safari may leave you vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

The question now is do you know how to find passwords in Mac via Safari? Do you know the steps to edit them accordingly?

Find out the answers below.

The Password AutoFill Feature

Safari’s password AutoFill feature indeed makes logging-in a breeze. This AutoFilling of your password works through Safari’s built-in keychain function. This covers not only your passwords but also your login prompts.

But it is also a fact that is not perfect. There is always the risk of hackers finding their way to your autocomplete passwords.

Hence, you must realize that you don’t need to use the AutoFill feature all the time. For sites that require your credit card information, it is best not to use the AutoFill feature.

Instead, use it for less important sites. These include your forums and gaming sites.

And though you can easily change your current passwords for different sites, you still have to worry about the older ones you saved months ago.

How to Find Passwords on Mac on Your Safari

With the safety and security of your login credentials at risk, you need to learn how to find passwords on Mac that you saved in Safari.

Check out this guide we prepared below:

Viewing and Editing

Viewing and editing your old passwords on Safari involves some steps. However, these steps are easy to follow and will only take you a few minutes to complete.

First, click the Safari tab and hit “Preferences.” Find the “Passwords” tab at the top then enter your Mac password. You may also use your touch ID if you wish.

From there, you will see the list of websites and the corresponding passwords that you previously saved. To edit a particular password, simply double-click it. You can also double-click on the username to edit.

You can also manage your stored passwords in Safari using your iPad. Open the Settings app and hit “Safari.” Tap “Passwords” and enter your passcode.

You may also use your Touch ID to enter.

From there, you will see a list of all the passwords you saved in Safari. To view them, tap on the site name. To delete, hit “Edit” and tap the minus sign beside the site name you want to delete.

Tap “Delete” to complete the process.

In case you want to add a new login, tap “Add Password. Enter the URL, username, and password to finish up.

Bonus tip: click on the link if you wish to learn how to see WiFi password in Mac.

How to Delete Them

Going back to your Mac, if you want to delete any of your old passwords, repeat the steps for viewing your passwords. Upon reaching the list of passwords, choose the one that you wish to delete.

Click “Remove” to delete the item.

If you wish to discard multiple passwords, press and hold the command key. Select the passwords you want to delete then hit “Remove.”

How to Protect Them

We earlier discussed that hackers can prey on passwords that you store in Safari. Thus, you need to learn how to protect them, as well as your accounts.

If you plan to save your passwords on a web browser, you may want to consider dropping the idea. This applies to all kinds of browsers. Since you likely transact using your iPhone, your accounts will be in jeopardy once your device falls into the wrong hands.

With your passwords on AutoFill, people can gain access to your accounts. They can use your personal information to make all sorts of transactions at your expense.

They can even steal your identity.

Thankfully, you can turn off Safari’s AutoFill feature. To do this, open Safari and click on “Preferences.” Select “Passwords” and untick the “AutoFill usernames and passwords” option.

Another option is to use a password manager. This works by keeping all your passwords in one place. Moreover, it protects against AES-256 encryption.

Last but not least, consider deleting your passwords. But first, copy all your passwords and place them in a secure password vault. Thereafter, delete all your passwords from Safari.

Changing Preferences

Another great thing about Safari’s AutoFill feature is you can tweak its preferences. Open Safari, click “Preferences” and hit “AutoFill.” This will open a list of preferences that you can edit.

You have the option to complete forms using contact cards from your Contacts. You can also save the information you enter when using your games or entering webpage forums.

But more importantly, you can edit your preferences for your credit card information. You may secure your card number, cardholder name, and expiration date. This will make it easier for you the next time you use your credit card in an online transaction.

But if you’re looking to protect your credit card information, it is best not to save them in your Safari browser. You can add or remove credit cards by clicking “Edit.”

In case you no longer want to use the AutoFill feature, you have the option to turn it off. To do this, open Safari, click “Preferences” then “AutoFill.” Scan for the information that you wish to enter manually and deselect.

Maximize the Power of Your Mac

As a Safari user, learning how to find passwords in Mac is crucial. It will help keep your accounts secure. It will keep your credit card details and other personal information safe.

And if you are a new Mac user, there are a lot more things to learn. We encourage you to read other blog posts on Macs. Discuss tips and tricks that will help you maximize the power of your computer.

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